Expert advice about flowers & bouquets

Here is a selection of Q&As from Your East Midlands Wedding magazine whether it be about flowers, hair and makeup, fashion, wedding themes, health & beauty, cakes, stationery, legal advice. If you would like your question answered by our experts, please email it to editor@youreastmidlands.wedding

 

Freshly picked ideas

Freshly picked ideas

Q. For our wedding day, we're looking at different floral options for our two flower girls. What's currently popular?

A. Samantha Chubb says: If you're looking for floral ideas for your flowergirls, the options are extensive. Flower wands are the most requested choice; these could be made using single or multiple flowers such as roses or carnations and embellished with items such as diamante gems or butterflies to give extra sparkle and interest. The handles could be finished with ribbon for extra comfort and are perfect for little hands to hold. For slightly older children, floral decorated metal wands might be more ideal. These come in a variety of different colours and styles, including hearts, stars and butterflies. For teenagers, a small posy created with flowers that match the bridal bouquet might be a more suitable option.

Other handheld items include pomander balls, parasols and baskets which come in an array of different materials and fabrics – making them a perfect choice for most wedding themes. These could be used to scatter petals down the aisle or filled with favourite blooms.

For hands-free use, wrist corsages are perfect as the flowers could be tied around the wrist with ribbon or attached to an elasticated bracelet. The bracelets make a stunning jewellery addition and come in many colours and styles including pearl beads and rhinestone.

For the finishing touches, a headband or circlet could be decorated with mini flowers and are perfect for children with short hair. Floral arrangements could also be added to other hair accessories such as hair clips and side combs for girls with longer hair

Samantha Chubb,Melolivia Flowers
www.meloliviaflowers.co.uk

 

In bloom

In bloom

Q. If you're planning a winter wedding then here's some inspirational ideas for flowers.

A. Samantha Chubb says: To create a beautiful look for a winter wedding, I would suggest using white or red flowers such as roses, carnations or peonies for the floral bouquets, buttonholes and centrepieces.

These can be incorporated with seasonal foliage such as ivy, dusty miller, holly or mistletoe. If couples wish to add a touch of sparkle, try placing diamanté gems in the centre of the flowers and enhance with embellishments.

Flower glitter can also be used as this gives off a wonderful sheen when it catches the light. Foliage leaves look wonderful in their natural colour, but if you're looking for something more special, spray them in different colours such as silver or gold depending on your taste.

Another great way to combine different shades into flowers is by using ribbons in an array of colours, styles and textures. Glittery silver, gold star or heart wands with matching flowers are ideal for a flowergirl.

To incorporate the joys of Christmas try poinsettia flowers, pine cones, glittery tree decorations, fir wreaths and garlands, all great ways to add extra festiveness to the venue.

Samantha Chubb
www.meloliviaflowers.co.uk

 

Festive bunch

Festive bunch

Q. For my winter wedding I want flowers that look festive but I need a bouquet to withstand the weather, what blooms can you suggest?

A. Laura Peltell says: Laura says: If you want that festive look, we recommend red roses as your main flower! Not only the ultimate symbol of love and romance but they also look beautiful against a white or ivory wedding dress. We favour red Naomi roses for winter weddings as they stay fresh for longer in the cold and they have a sweet scent. Complement the Naomi roses by teaming them with hypericum 'Tomato Flair', an evergreen plant which produces beautiful red berries in the autumn, and skimmia 'Rubella', also evergreen, which has clusters of burgundy-coloured buds in the winter. If you wanted a wider variety of flowers, we recommend red spray roses 'Mirabel' and red tulips 'Ile De France'. For your foliage, use eucalyptus 'Cinerea' and Scots Pine because they both smell amazing, and the pine especially evoke festive feelings.

Laura Peltell
www.flowersbysuzanne.co.uk

 

Blooming boiling

Blooming boiling

Q. Can you advise on the best flowers for summer weddings? I want a seasonal look and blooms that won't wilt in the heat.

A. Jessica Wells says: Some of the most sought after blooms are at their optimum quality during the summer months. Hydrangeas, tea roses, stocks, nigella and peonies are all at their natural best. With stunning new varieties becoming available, we're seeing brides being bold with their choice of colours. Unfortunately, most seasonal flowers can wilt in extreme weather conditions, however, a good florist will use all the precautionary measures to ensure they look beautiful all day. A tip to help your bouquet last is to have a vase filled with fresh cool water ready at your reception venue for it to stand in when you're seated or socialising.

Jessica Wells
www.jessicamaryflowers.co.uk

 

Wild blooms

Wild blooms

Q. I love natural looking flowers. What options do I have for a springtime wedding?

A. Samantha Chubb says: Greenery is a wonderful addition to any floral design and helps to create a more natural and relaxed look. Foliage comes in different varieties so it's a great way of adding texture. The most popular springtime faux flowers with our brides are roses in a variety of colours, gerberas for being big and bold, and gypsophila for its natural look and softness. To create a wild and hand-picked appearance, bouquets can be made to look less symmetrical in shape and hand-tied with lace or twine. This finish can also be incorporated into other items, such as buttonholes and corsages.

To complete the look, flower crowns are perfect for brides, bridesmaids and flowergirls. Your venue can also be styled with matching blooms and vases or jars decorated with lace or twine and placed on wooden logs to make perfect centrepieces.

Samantha Chubb
www.meloliviaflowers.co.uk

 

Roses are red

Roses are red

Q. We're planning a Valentine's Day wedding but I don't want the obvious when it comes to our flowers. What can we choose other than roses that still symbolises love?

A. Jessica Mary says: February brings us a stunning variety of blooms. As well as a large selection of roses there are also varieties of anenomes, eustomas, tulips and ranunculus that come in many different colours to complement your theme. Rather than worry about which flowers have the meaning of love, I'd choose your favourite blooms! Those that make you smile and capture your personality. If you follow this advice, you'll look back at your big-day pics in years to come and you'll still love the flowers you chose.

Jessica Mary
www.jessicamaryflowers.co.uk

 

Seasonal stems

Seasonal stems

Q. What can I add to my bouquet for that perfect wintry look?

A. Jacqui Scothern says: There's a range of beautiful blooms on offer during the winter months. Extra touches such as grasses, seed-heads, twigs, acorns and conkers or pine cones will add gorgeous texture to make a stunning rustic bouquet.

Looking for sparkle? Consider jewels, crystals, ribbons and feathers. These can add a real luxe-look to simple and sophisticated white blooms or a rich lustre to deep and vibrant flowers in shades of red, orange and purple. Foliage and berries can also be sprayed in gold, copper or silver to complement a modern industrial-styled wedding.

Berries in a range of hues from pale coral and pink through to orange and deep red can be used for a more traditional festive feel. If you're looking for a bouquet with a more dramatic effect, steel blue viburnum berries or black ivy berries look sensational teamed with both pure white or colourful blooms. Long streamers of natural dyed silk, sumptuous velvet, or sparkly ribbons add the finishing flourish.

Jacqui Scothern
www.akitofloral.com

 

Winter blooms

Winter blooms

Q. My bouquet needs to withstand the winter weather. What blooms can you suggest that are sturdy but stunning?

A. Ruby Adds says: Combining big beautiful hydrangea, the delicacy of white narcissus, soft gypsophila, anemones with blue stamen and brassica will create a snow-like effect. Interrupted with the intense blue of eryngium and a soft green such as eucalyptus, will form a striking winter arrangement. A beautifully delicate touch to any winter bouquet is pussy willow – twig-like with little white furry pods standing out like tiny fairylights makes it unusual and stunning. Berries are also a gorgeous addition to light up any winter bouquet.

If you fancy going less conventional, the possibilities are endless! Brighten up those grey winter afternoons with a vivacious king protea surrounded with berries and miss piggy roses and your bouquet will be unforgettable.

Ruby Adds
www.mylovebirdswedding.com